Diane Jacobs, “object n. object v.”

Image List for MCBA Prize 2017

 

  1. object n. object v. (1_DianeJacobs_composit object_open_close) –object n. object v. is housed in a cylindrical box reminiscent of a Greek column, a wonder cabinet, and Pandora’s box. More than two hundred Amazon names were sandblasted on the outer shell, as was additional text on the glass doors.

 

  1. object n. object v. (2_DianeJacobs_breast_shelves) – The left side of the box features body parts. Eggshells were filled with plaster and nipples were painted with oil paint. Each semicircular shelf is paired, on the obverse side with an excerpt from Ruby Blondell’s book Helen of Troy – Beauty, Myth, Devastation. The shocking quotes cut to the core of the sexist paradigm.

 

  1. object n. object v. (3_DianeJacobs_Nest_shelves) – Human hair, the text is laser cut.

 

  1. object n. object v. (4_DianeJacobs_3_Amazons) – The India ink Amazon figures were derived from imagery on ancient Greek pottery. Handset type and polymer plate images are letterpress printed on Johannot paper.

 

  1. object n. object v. (5_DianeJacobs_map) – 3-color letterpress printed hand drawn pop-up map. Other materials in project include: gold leaf, molded handmade cotton paper, acrylic balls, military dog tags, plaster, leather, brass and metal beads, wire, and antique glass & aluminum slide mounts; India ink on vellum, and water color.

Laughter is a powerful way to access the heart — to coax a viewer to let down their guard so that they can venture into new territory. My work is political and makes commentary on social justice issues; I challenge the status quo through artist’s books, installations, mixed-media sculpture, printmaking, and works on paper. I lure my audience with texture, juxtaposition, humor, and the unexpected. I use the sensual quality of letterpress-printed paper, the intrinsic meaning of found objects (such as military dog tags), and the element of surprise to seduce the viewer to come close, open their mind, be courageous, and make connections between power, greed, and exploitation.

 

object n. object v. is a sculptural artist book that juxtaposes two very different realities for women who lived north of the Mediterranean Sea during Classical antiquity. Ancient Greek society regarded beauty along with chastity, as the most important characteristics for females; male desire objectified the female body. Beautiful women represented danger that had to be controlled, thus giving rise to an oppressive and misogynist culture. At the same time, an egalitarian nomadic society roamed from Thrace to as far east as Mongolia. These Scythian women warriors were known as Amazons. These starkly opposite realities simultaneously obscure and magnify our present day struggle for equality. object n. object v. is housed in a cylindrical box reminiscent of a Greek column, a wonder cabinet, and Pandora’s box.

 

The left side of the box features body parts made of tangerine rind, eggshell, ceramic, and human hair on semicircular shelves. These are paired, on the obverse of the shelves, with excerpts from Ruby Blondell’s book Helen of Troy – Beauty, Myth, Devastation. The shocking quotes cut to the core of the sexist paradigm.

 

The right side of the box tells an empowering story, unraveling the myths associated with the Amazons and offering evidence about the warrior queens’ legacy.  Objects, images and excerpts from Adrienne Mayor’s book The Amazons: Lives & Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World reveal that the skilled horse riders wore trousers; adorned themselves with tattoos, fought valiantly using recurve bows, battle-axes, slings and lassos, and enjoyed sexual freedom.

 

Diane Jacobs
Portland, Oregon
www.dianejacobs.net

object n. object v.
2016
sculptural artist’s book
4
12
13″ x 27″ x 6″
13″ x 12″ x 12″