Anne Greenwood Rioseco, “Tapestry of Hours”

Tapestry of Hours Image Index
Tapestry of Hours is an edition of one hundred and thirty-eight chapbooks and twelve
special edition portfolios with chapbook and tapestry.
The special edition portfolio is made of crinoline, machine sewn and hand-dyed in fustic
with the pressure printed, machine-stitched text from a cut-up poem written by Anne
Greenwood. 8”x12”x1” closed, 8”x16.5”x.5 open, edition: 12
The special edition chapbook cover is machine stitching on crinoline, the under print is
pressure printed, hand-stitched embroidery with pochoir. The decorations are handstitched
embroidery sigils by Anne Greenwood and Shannon Ayuyu pressure printed on
kitakata paper. 7”x11”x.5”, edition: 12
The tapestry is made of crinoline hand-dyed in madder, fustic, cochineal and indigo, with
hand-stitching and pochoir. The machine-stitched texts are cut-ups of Hazel Hall’s poetry
made by Shannon Ayuyu and Anne Greenwood. The pressure printed textiles are found
fabric and doily with hand cutwork. The poem Loneliness is written by Hazel Hall,
rewritten by Anne Greenwood and printed with a polymer plate. 34”x 22”, edition: 12
The larger edition chapbook is laser printed on Mohawk Superfine. 6”x10” edition: 138
The printing is all by Clare Carpenter, and laser printing by Minute Man, 2016 Portland,
Oregon.

 

Anne Greenwood Rioseco
Portland, Oregon
www.annegreenwood.net

Tapestry of Hours
2016
Textiles, ponchoir, hand and machine stitching, pressure printing, hand embroidery, buckram, indigo, fustic, cochineal, oasage natural dyes, digital printing, Mohawk Superfine & Mulberry papers
special edition:12, trade edition:138
22
8”x16.5”x.5
8”x12”x1”

My current work investigates the social histories embedded in cultural and
art objects, especially those combining historic and contemporary materials.
I am interested in repurposing textiles and book art, and recasting these
artifacts with new meanings while preserving their historical integrity. My
latest work, Tapestry of Hours, an edition of fabric books, is at once physical
and ephemeral: it fuses the work of early 20th c. Oregon poet Hazel Hall with
my own writing and hand and machine stitching and printing on hand-dyed
crinoline. I collaborated with emerging artist Shannon Ayuyu who, like Hall,
was disabled at a young age and has personally experienced how it is to feel
separate, but also how art can be a tool for transformation and connection.
Hazel Hall was born in St. Paul, Minnesota on February 2, 1886 and moved
to Portland, Oregon as a small child. At the age of twelve, she suffered from
scarlet fever and related complications leaving her confined to a wheel chair:
her formal schooling ended in the fifth grade. To help her family financially,
Hazel Hall took in sewing and as her eyesight began to fail in her early
twenties, she wrote poetry. She died in Portland, in 1924 at the age of thirtyeight.
Hazel’s sister Ruth, who was a librarian, helped her immensely as an
advocate and agent for both her stitching and poetry.
Tapestry of Hours is made in an edition of one hundred and thirty-eight laser
printed, hand-bound chapbooks and twelve special edition portfolios with
chapbook and tapestry.
The special edition portfolio is made of buckram, machine sewn and handdyed
with pressure-printed, machine-stitched text from a cut-up poem
written by Anne Greenwood. The chapbook cover is machine stitching on
crinoline, the under print is pressure printed, hand-stitched embroidery with
pochoir and hand-bound using the pamphlet stitch. The decorations are
hand-stitched embroidery sigils by Anne Greenwood and Shannon Ayuyu
pressure printed on kitakata paper. The tapestry is made of crinoline handdyed
in madder, fustic, cochineal and indigo, with hand stitching and
pochoir. The machine-stitched texts are cut-ups of Hazel Hall’s poetry made
by Shannon Ayuyu and Anne Greenwood. The pressure printed textiles are
found fabric and doily with hand cutwork. The poem Loneliness, is written
by Hazel Hall, rewritten by Anne Greenwood and printed with a polymer
plate. The printing is all by Clare Carpenter 2016 Portland, Oregon. This
project was funded in part by a Oregon Regional Arts & Culture Council
Grant, Caldera Artist-In-Residency, and The Hallie Ford Foundation.